Table of Contents

2019 Month : September Volume : 8 Issue : 39 Page : 2958-2962

Seroprevalence of TORCH Infections in Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

Kavitha Paul Konikkara1, Irene Jose Manjiyil2, Vimalraj Angattukuzhiyil Narayanan3, Prithi Nair Kannambra4

1Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Thrissur, Kerala, India. 2Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Thrissur, Kerala, India. 3Additional Professor, Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Thrissur, Kerala, India. 4Professor and HOD, Department of Microbiology, Government Medical College, Thrissur, Kerala, India.

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